What are Mosquitoes

What are Mosquitoes?

So What are Mosquitoes? The name mosquito is a Spanish word which means “little fly.” Many people think that mosquitoes bite humans because they need to feed on the blood of humans, but that is not true. Mosquitoes feed on plant nectar, just like bees. They are a group of about 3500 different species, that is a type of fly.

Female mosquitoes need blood for the development of their eggs before laying them, while male mosquitos do not require blood at all. However, they are very disturbing and dangerous to humans. Not only do they carry diseases that affect humans, but they can also transmit many parasites and diseases that affect horses and dogs.

They play an essential part in the ecosystem because they serve as a food source for many other organisms. There are many different species of mosquitoes. They live in specific environments and demonstrate individual behaviour, biting various types of animals.

Mosquitoes Infestation

Mosquitoes live in a range of environments. But they are primarily concentrated near standing water. In the reproduction of mosquitoes, their eggs require water to hatch. Some species of mosquitoes lay eggs in moist soil and hatch when the soil is flooded by water.

While other species lay eggs in water or near standing water. Female mosquitoes can potentially lay up to 200 eggs at one time. These eggs may lay dormant for 10-15 years and hatch in the summer when the conditions are right. In 24-48 hours after hatching the eggs become a larva.

The sites in which some species can lay eggs include;

  • Buckets
  • Tree holes
  • Places as small as bottle caps
  • Tarpaulins or plastic covers
  • Old tires
  • Potted plant trays and saucers
  • Toys

Mosquito Bites and Treatment

Mosquito bites generally look like a small itchy bump. People who are allergic to these bites have a more intense reaction to these bites. They are able to transmit many serious diseases through their bites,  such as malaria, yellow fever, and West Nile virus.

However, a mosquito bite to itself is harmless. Due to the risks involved,  preventing mosquito bites with insect repellent, when outside, is always smart. If it seems that the bites are severe or causing undue irritation, consult a  medical professional as soon as possible.

What are Mosquitoes Attracted to?

Humid and hot summers bring mosquitoes. Sometimes our skin produces more of a specific chemical. Some of these chemicals, like lactic acid,  attract mosquitoes. There is also evidence that mosquitoes are more attracted to the O-Blood group as compared to A and B-Blood groups.

Mosquitoes use carbon dioxide as a primary source to identify their targets. Mosquitoes are very attracted to people in dark clothes as compared to light coloured garments. A mosquito will use smell, sight and heat to find a blood meal. Studies show that the mosquitoes see dark places clearly as compared to bright areas.

If mosquitoes are making it difficult for you to spend time outdoors in your garden or stopping you from having that BBQ in fear they will attack your guests, let us help you. Give Control Pest Management a call today.

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